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Windows 10 users and while the company earlier promised that it would bring the browser on other platforms such as Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, and MAC OS, the launch date saw Microsoft announcing the browser as Windows 10 exclusive with the company saying that support for other platforms “coming soon.” Turns out that Microsoft kind of lied when it said the browser is Windows 10 exclusive at the launch date. As first spotted by Bleeping Computer, the Windows 10 Edge installer also works Windows 7, meaning you can download and install the Chromium-based Microsoft Edge browser on your Windows 7 PC. The only catch here is that you won’t be able to download the installer from Microsoft Edge website. Therefore, to taste the Microsoft Edge browser on your Windows 7 PC you have to download the installer from a Windows 10 PC, and then make a copy of the installer file, paste it to your Windows 7 PC. Follow the necessary steps and your attempt of installing the browser should be a success, you’ll also be able to use the browser and there shouldn’t be any issue with surfing the web. For more and direct download links visit OUR FORUM.

Microsoft has detailed a March attack on Windows customers in the satellite and communications sectors using "unusual, interesting techniques" that bear the hallmarks of APT group MuddyWater. The company's Office 365 ATP picked up archive (ACE) files loaded with the recently discovered WinRAR flaw, CVE-2018-20250, which has become widely used among cybercrime groups and nation-state hackers in recent months. The bug was co-opted for hacking after a February 20 report from Israeli security firm Check Point revealed that a malicious ACE file could place malware anywhere on a Windows PC after being extracted by WinRAR. Locations include the Windows Startup folder, where the malware would automatically execute on each reboot. A month before Check Point's report, WinRAR developers released a new version that dropped support for ACE because it was unable to update a library in WinRAR called Unacev2.dll that contained a directory traversal flaw. However, by March, when this attack was detected by Microsoft, it's likely a large chunk of the world's 500 million WinRAR users hadn't updated to the non-ACE version or hadn't removed the vulnerable DLL. The MuddyWater group's activities were first spotted in 2017. It is known to target users in the Middle East, Europe, and the US. The group frequently doctors up phishing documents to appear as if they're from security arms of various governments.  For more visit OUR FORUM.

I thought deactivating my Facebook account would stop the social network from tracking me online. But Facebook kept tabs on me anyway. Over the past year, I've tried to minimize my presence on Facebook. I deleted a 10-year-old account and replaced it with a dummy account that I use as little as possible. I deleted the app from my phone. As of January, I started deactivating my dummy account every time I used it, rather than just log out. I couldn't break up completely with Facebook because I needed it to sign up twice a week for a workshop. I thought the precautions would reduce how much data Facebook gathered about me. Turns out, I was wasting my time. Even when your account is deactivated, the social network continues collecting data about your online activities. All that data gets sent back to Facebook and is tied to your account while it's in this state of limbo. It's as if you'd changed nothing. On the site, Facebook explains that deactivating is a half-step to complete deletion. But it says little about how data collection works during the period. In its data policy, Facebook suggests deactivation to manage your privacy but doesn't mention that it still collects data during that period. The ongoing collection of data from deactivated accounts could be considered misleading, privacy experts warn. The social network's Share button is on 275 million web pages. It collects data allowing advertisers to see what kind of content you're viewing. That's why you're likely to see ads for sports in your Facebook feed if you've been visiting a lot of sports websites. Complete details can be found on OUR FORUM.

 

The UK government announced today a set of online safety laws designed to hold the companies behind social media platforms liable for the harmful behavior spreading through their platforms. As detailed in the Online Harms White Paper joint proposal published by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport and the UK Home Office, the law package "comprises legislative and non-legislative measures and will make companies more responsible for their users’ safety online, especially children and other vulnerable groups." At the moment the Online Harms White Paper is under an open consultations status which will allow the government to collect opinions from "organizations, companies, and others with relevant views, insights or evidence" regarding the future online safety regulatory framework, a consultation which will end at 23:59, on July 1, 2019. UK's proposed online safety laws will appoint an independent regulator to enforce the future standards which will force social media companies and tech firms alike to follow a mandatory "duty of care" to protect users while using their platform, with heavy fines to be issued if they fail to deliver. Right now, the regulator which will enforce the future framework is not yet appointed and the UK Government is yet to decide if it should be a new or an already existing body. "The internet can be brilliant at connecting people across the world - but for too long these companies have not done enough to protect users, especially children, and young people, from harmful content," said Prime Minister Theresa May. "That is not good enough, and it is time to do things differently." Get caught up by visiting OUR FORUM.

Microsoft is all set to make some changes to the Windows update rollout process, offering users more control over the update process. The Redmond giant recently revealed the name of the upcoming major release of Windows 10. It’s called the Windows 10 May 2019 Update. There will be no Windows 10 April 2019 Update. Microsoft decided to postpone the release of the OS due to technical issues. Once the Windows 10 April 2019 Update is available for the general public, users will be able to decide whether they want to install it on their devices or not. This feature has been added as a part of the recent changes that made to the Windows update rollout process. As we already reported, Windows 10 users can now pause all the updates on their systems for up to 35 days. Microsoft acknowledged the fact that the changes have been implemented based on user feedback. As a matter of fact, Windows users have been complaining about the disruptive Windows update process for many years. Users can now choose when they want to initiate the installation process for the Windows 10 May 2019 Update. Additionally, Microsoft plans to send notifications to the users as soon as a major update has been released. Now, let’s talk about other features included in the latest Windows 10 update. Cortana digital assistant is going to be separated from Windows Search and a new sandbox functionality will be added. Microsoft will start rolling out the update to the Release Preview ring Insiders next week. The public rollout is expected to start next month. Learn more by visiting OUR FORUM.

An online black market offering cybercrime goods and services was found on Facebook, spreading over 74 groups and totaling around 385,000 members, according to a report by Cisco Talos security researchers. "The majority of these groups use fairly obvious group names, including 'Spam Professional,' 'Spammer & Hacker Professional,' 'Buy Cvv On THIS SHOP PAYMENT BY BTC,' and 'Facebook hack (Phishing),' says Cisco Talos. More to the point, the members of these Facebook groups sell, buy, and exchange anything from account credentials and phishing tools and services credit card info and fake IDs. "Others products and services were also promoted. We saw spammers offering access to large email lists, criminals offering assistance moving large amounts of cash, and sales of shell accounts at various organizations, including government," also said the Cisco Talos researchers. What's even more surprising is that it is very simple to find and join these cybercrime-focused Facebook groups, especially since Facebook's algorithms will automatically suggest joining similar groups from the same network designed to promote illegal cybercrime tools and services. While Cisco Talos first tried to take down the groups using the social network's abuse report feature, the security researchers had to eventually reach out to Facebook and disclosed their findings after their initial attempts weren't fully successful. This led to the eventual takedown of most of the Facebook groups involved in the virtual black market, but, as reported by Cisco Talos, new groups have been created and some of them are still active and need to be closed by the social network's security team. Read more on OUR FORUM.

 

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